21 search results for "disaster resources"

School and Family Disaster Resource Page

WHAT TO DO IF DISASTER STRIKES

Many agencies including FEMA and the RED CROSS offer much information, including for for families with special populations.

GENERAL ASSISTANCE, including Access and Functional Needs Information:

 RED CROSS disaster safety checklist in multiple languges

DISASTER ASSISTANCE by FEMA 

ASSISTANCE FOR THE AUTISM COMMUNITY:

Spirit of Autism

Autism Speaks

ASL / SIGN LANGUAGE RESOURCES FOR DISASTER PREPAREDNESS for the DEAF

SIGNING FAMILIES

DEAFinc VIDEOS  (including the one below)

Other Disaster Preparation Resources

Earthquake Country Alliance – SEE BELOW, too

ShakeOut Earthquake Drill registration 

Hurricane Preparedness 

TsunamiZone

Ready.gov for many disaster preparedness resources, including Floods and Fires

 

How to become involved with Disaster Preparedness and Response on Social Media Platforms

 

Follow ShakeOut:

 

Others to follow on Twitter:

 

Post away these images and links on your social sites!  ShakeOut.org and RedCross.org

Tweet 2.4 Tweet 3.5 dropcoverholdon_re copy

 

 

Sign Language for Emergency Responders

Louise offers training for First Responders and Community members regarding how to communicate and engage with our Deaf citizens. Also, instruction regarding helping those on the Autism spectrum.

Fees vary. Please email for details. 

 

 

 Communication when time is of the essence is one of our top priorities!

Helping to ease communication when it counts the most – during emergencies and disasters – is of extreme importance to us. That is why Louise Sattler offers multiple trainings to help community rescuers, including emergency responders,  medical personnel, educators, hospitality and transportation organizations and many others learn how to engage, interact and communicate with individuals who have access and functional special needs.

INFORMATION for HELPING people with Access and Functional Needs (AFN) 

READ articles about disaster preparedness penned by Louise on her blog

CERT/ EMS / AFN / SCHOOL and PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATION TRAININGS AVAILABLE . Please use the contact form below to inquire. 

 

A Top 10 list that can save lives!

Computer generated image with text TOP 10

A TOP 10 list that can save lives! I hope that you decided to read past the title because you are a fan of David Letterman’s famous TOP 10 lists.  All kidding aside, I really am hoping that I piqued your interest because you are curious about the last part of the title – “save lives”

It is no secret that much of what as I do in media is examine topics related to communication, education, and safety.  I often have penned blogs spotlighting disaster preparedness and response, often citing personal experiences. In fact, earlier this week I re-posted an article giving general resources to help families in the event of a disaster.  I had written that article shortly after visiting many areas in Oklahoma – from cities to rural areas – that were devastated following a series of tornadoes in 2013.

Read My tour of Moore, Oklahoma

In addition, I have been involved with several specific media campaigns that focus on helping families and schools to be prepared for disasters, including earthquakes.  Currently, I am a member of a social media team that supports ShakeOut – the world’s largest earthquake drill.  ShakeOut is much more than a practice drill as it entails an  interactive educational component that is dedicated to increasing awareness about how to prepare for earthquakes. ShakeOut spotlights teaching how people should  DROP – COVER and HOLD ON when an earthquake happens. At first, this three-step protocol surprised me! I thought if an earthquake happened I should run to a doorway and stand.  I also recalled believing that it would be best to run outside away from buildings. (I am fairly certain I am not alone in assuming this was the correct procedure and am glad that I have been corrected in my thinking!)  But, thanks to  ShakeOut and their considerable due diligence of garnering information from rescue teams, there is much available information and instruction on the best practices for earthquake safety.

Why shouldn’t we run to door jams or outside during an earthquake? 

Official rescue teams who have been dispatched to the scene of earthquakes and other disasters around the world continue to advocate use of the internationally recognized “Drop, Cover and Hold On” protocol to protect lives during earthquakes: 

  • DROP to the ground (before the earthquake drops you!),
  • Take COVER by getting under a sturdy desk or table, and 
  • HOLD ON to it until the shaking stops.

If there isn’t a table or desk near you, drop to the ground in an inside corner of the building and cover your head and neck with your hands and arms. Do not try to run to another room just to get under a table.

Read more about DROP – COVER and HOLD ON!, including what to do if you are not able to take cover, are in a wheelchair or other special circumstances. (For me, it was interesting to learn what to do if in a stadium during a sporting event!) 

Recommended Earthquake Actionsdropcoverholdon_re copy

Special Note: Mark your calendars for the 2015 ShakeOut drill: October 15th at 10:15 a.m. 

image

I have spent considerable time perusing the ShakeOut site and I came across some great features that I thought would be of interest to families, homeschooler and educators.  Here is my list of the ShakeOut “Top 10”!

#10- REGISTER  your family, business, school, organization or individuals for the ShakeOut drill via this LINK.  When you are all finished with the very fast registration process let others know by clicking the social media platform share buttons.

Note: Fans of social media don’t miss the weekly Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety  chats by following on Twitter @ShakeOut

#9- Play BEAT THE QUAKE – a game that uses loads of action and interesting questions to spark the interest of any child or adults who are kids at heart.

Go to ShakeOut.org and find the Beat the Quake link on the right column

#8- What’s in your disaster kit?

Do you have a disaster preparedness kit?  Does it include all the essentials that are recommended by disaster preparedness specialists, such as the Red Cross and Earthquake Country Alliance.  

List of supplies for your earthquake disaster kit. 

Don’t forget to add the whistle!

#7. Let others know you are safe!

An app made available by the Red Cross allows you to communicate to loved ones that you are safe or in need of assistance during the “after” stage of an earthquake.  (Note: Similar apps also are available for other disasters such as Hurricane or Tornados)  Click here for information about the Red Cross App. (The image below also will take you to the Safe and Well Website.)

Red Cross

#6. Materials for Schools/ Educators  .  Teachers don’t miss this opportunity for a  “learning moment” contrasting the reality of actual earthquakes with the fiction presented in the 2015 Summer movie San Andreas. While entertaining, San Andreas was largely a fictionalized version of the “real deal”.  To highlight the salient facts, the Earthquake Country Alliance has made available this movie parody and supplemental materials that clearly explain the fact vs. fiction about earthquakes in a child – friendly and  entertaining manner! Both the image and this link will take you to the movie!

Seven_Steps_To_Earthquake_Movie_Safety

#5. Materials to help businesses owners  prepare and learn what to do if an earthquake happens (including in the recovery phase). Note: Don’t miss the Seven Steps to an Earthquake Resilient Business

#4. Key Earthquake Safety Tips for People with Disabilities and Other Access or Functional Needs (Regular readers of this blog will know that this is a subject near and dear to my heart)  Read these materials and much more here

Previous blog: Disaster Safety Tips for Families with Special Needs 

#3. In fact, there are so many other resources that I would need to make a Top 20 list! Note: the resources are downloadable and are visually very attractive for posting. Consider laminating if you work or live with young children.

Go to resource page

#2. Don’t speak English? No worries. The ShakeOut site is also in Spanish.

Drum Roll…

#1: Share YOUR ShakeOut with a photo or story!

Here is link to upload your story or picture! How fun is this feature?!

But wait there is a bonus to the Top 10 list!

Want to follow some fun social media posts? Simply track the hashtags #ShakeOut and #DropCoverHoldOn. You never know which friends of Where Learning Meets Laughter will be posting!  Feel free to tag me in your post as @LouiseASL (Twitter) or @LouiseMasinSattler (Instagram).

AND…I just uploaded the FAMILY and SCHOOL DISASTER RESOURCE PAGE on this blog. Please add to the comment section any additional resources you feel would be helpful within our communities to keep all safe!

Dropping popcorn in striped classic package.

In closing, it is now time for popcorn as here is a great video clip to watch and share with others!

About Helping Those with Autism

 

meltdown-1312488_1280What is Autism?
 

Autism is a complicated disorder that is neurologically based. Autism is a spectrum, that is why it is known as ASD) with these being the most distinctive characteristics:

1. Communication challenges which may mean using sign language, communication boards, or another augmentative means for communication

2- Challenges with social-interaction

3 – Repetitive tasks or vocalizations

4- Can be overwhelmed sounds (eg. sirens) , lights (such as those on an ambulance), and even a light touch.

5- Some with Autism do not transition well and depend on routine. Changes in routine, such as during an evacuation – can prove problematic.

 

Tips

A child with Autism can best be helped by having preparedness opportunities – learning via practice about the sights, sounds and other aspects of what may happen in the event of an emergency or disaster.  Social stories also help with preparedness. Examples of social stories  via Pinterest here  (and other professional sites)

Things to have on hand on hand if an individual with Autism needs to be evacuated or placed in an unfamiliar setting:

Shirt with a hood to decrease noise and visual sensations

Toys such as a Slinky(tm) or small car to help with transition. (Circular and shiny items are often desired items)

iPad or Tablet to help with communication and occupy time

Augmentative devices used by the child, including language boards or cards

Any transition object that the child uses on a regular basis

Someone familiar with the child- if at all possible, including a peer or assistant

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

During a disaster an autistic person may be prone to flee, hide or react in a much different than expected manner as compared to typical peers.

It is important to keep the person with Autism supervised.

If a person with Autism is missing please check bodies of WATER – such as pools, ponds, etc.

Recommended Resources

Spirit of Autism A Paramedic’s viewpoint and suggestions for helping those with Autism by a mom with an Autistic son.

Autism Speaks – A highly recommended resource for parent and professionals

 

Traveling Differently- Resources

Are you a travel business or organization that offers assistance for those who travel differently? I would love to add you to my new resource page here! And, if you are a traveler with unique challenges – please let me know about your experiences or resources to be included in this forum!

 

THANK YOU!

Why Resources for Traveling Differently Are Important to Share

I know that not everyone can travel the same.  Some people may use mobility devices, such as wheelchairs or walkers, while others may have sensory challenges (including Deaf or Blind). And, then there are those who have unique challenges such as Autism or cognitive delays. 

This resource section is to be of help to all and the comment section is open for you to add your own links to resources you have found helpful. Please do your due diligence with these websites.  We try our best to check the content prior to posting, however, we are not responsible for third party content.  Thank you.

Airline Transportation Resources for Traveling Differently

 

Southwest:  This airline has been in the forefront of helping those with special needs. Click here for information about their special assistance offerings.

Alaska Air:   Accessible services.

Cruise Transportation Resources for Traveling Differently

More Travel Related Resources with Links!

Consider having one of these when you travel if you use sign language, Spanish or Chinese for communication.  Order here:

SIGNING FAMILIES EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION MINI-CHART

This pocket-sized emergency communication chart has FOUR different languages represented. Photos for a dozen important informational signs are in sign language, English, Spanish and Chinese! There is a space for writing with a washable marker allows for efficient communication during challenging situations, such as medical emergencies or disasters. Also, numbers, common symbols (such as for email) and the alphabet is included. This card has a special coating for easy cleaning. This emergency mini – chart has been used by thousands of First Responders and Community Emergency Responder Teams (CERT). Also, valuable for those who work in schools, are involved with service related industries (such as bus drivers, flight attendants, etc.). Restauranteurs and hospitality workers are also using this chart to help customers who are in need of assistance. We offer this chart for those who reside in the United States. Price includes shipping within the USA. Don’t want to order via PayPal or don’t see a button to order? EMAIL US at the LINK BELOW! Bulk orders needed? EMAIL US! Shipping included, but note: we only ship within the United States. For outside the USA orders – please send an email. Thank you.

$1.49

 

 NOT FOR DUPLICATION

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DISASTER SAFETY INFORMATION FOR FAMILIES WITH SPECIAL NEEDS – 2015 updated post with additional safety resources

Update: Sadly tornado “season” has been wicked during 2015, therefore I am re – blogging this post that originally posted in 2013. At the bottom of this post are additional safety resources including for earthquake, flood, hurricane, tsunami and wildfire preparedness.

I could not fathom what must have happened here to make a truck flip and be impaled on these trees.

Today there have been a series of tragic tornadoes that have ripped through the heartland of America causing severe devastation, including loss of life.  Some of the families impacted who have been impacted have family members with special needs.

In an effort to help families and communities who may have some unique challenges during disasters here is some information:

BEFORE A DISASTER

Be prepared.  Alert your local fire department if you have a family member with special needs of any kind, such as physical, sensory, cognitive or other.  Included would be family members with dementia, Alzheimer’s or medical problems.

Have a family plan for sheltering in place and evacuation.

Be sure to have an emergency kit in your home and car.  To know what should be in your emergency kit go to the RED CROSS Disaster Information page.   Don’t forget to add to your kit personal effects, such as your insurance information, copies of marriage and birth certificates and photos of your family members.

For families with children, especially with special needs, have a quick “grab and go” kit of favorite items and things you know will comfort your child during a time of distress.  Stuffed animals, battery operated video games, and books or drawing pads all are good things to bring along. So, be prepared in advance with this GRAB AND GO KIT.

Let others know your plans if you need to evacuate. Where you intend to go and how you will try to check in.

WHAT TO DO IF DISASTER STRIKES

Many agencies including FEMA and the RED CROSS offer much information, including for for families with special populations.

GENERAL ASSISTANCE, including Access and Functional Needs Information:

 RED CROSS disaster safety checklist in multiple languges

DISASTER ASSISTANCE by FEMA 

ASSISTANCE FOR THE AUTISM COMMUNITY:

Spirit of Autism

Autism Speaks

ASL / SIGN LANGUAGE RESOURCES FOR DISASTER PREPAREDNESS for the DEAF

SIGNING FAMILIES

DEAFinc VIDEOS  (including the one below)

Other Disaster Preparation Resources

Earthquake Country Alliance 

ShakeOut Earthquake Drill registration 

Hurricane Preparedness 

TsunamiZone

Ready.gov for many disaster preparedness resources, including Floods and Fires

image

IF YOU HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL RESOURCES PLEASE SHARE BELOW IN THE COMMENT SECTION

Recommendations and Resources

NOTE: Please do your due diligence when perusing resources that are not created by Signing Families (Louise Sattler).  We do our best to vett each resource, but as times change, so may the content on these sites.  We are not responsible for the content of third parties. Thank you.

Deaf / Sign Language / Interpreting Resources

Deafness, Deaf Community, Interpreting Resources

National Association of the Deaf

Gallaudet UniversityRIDAmerican

Speech and Hearing Association 

ASLStuff.com

LIFEPRINT.com

SIGNINGSAVVY.com

ASLPRO.com

DPAN.com

CART SERVICES via INTELLITEXT:

Intellitext services: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qH9lzRtQAf0

Video specific to remote services, which applies to you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIRq6cwO1Yo

 

Emergency and Disaster Preparedness Resources

 

FEMA (including information on how to make a disaster plan for your family and CERT information)RED CROSS  

SHAKOUT.org

FloodSmart Community Resources

Emergency Planning – Protect Your Pet

 

Resources for people with unique challenges

Other topics may that may interest our readers

If you could give advice to start-up entrepreneurs…

I recently attended a bridal shower and this question was posed… “What would be the one piece of advice to give to a new couple?” Lots of great pearls of wisdom were generated by the shower attendees. A lot of what was said really resonated with me.

During the drive home I realized that I could extend this question to “wanna be entrepreneurs”.  What would have been the “gems of information” I wish I had known before I journeyed in to becoming a “solo-entrepreneur” aka solopreneur?

Before I arrived home I actually had amassed quite the list! So, here in no certain order are the things I learned in the past 10+ years! Feel free to use the comment section to add your sage words, as well! And, if you are looking for some great biz information check out the start-up #entreps column in the Huffington Post by my 411 Voices colleague, Sandy Abrams.

  1.  Seek advice from experts in starting a business. Some people find the Small Business Association in their area a huge resource. I owe a debt of gratitude for the help I received in launching SIGNING FAMILIES to Karen Geary, my first mentor, who I met at a special program for start-up entrepreneurs via the Howard Community College in Columbia, Maryland. Mentors can help you learn how to protect your intellectual property, trademark your business name, obtain a business license and set up bank accounts. There is a “ton of stuff” you probably will need to learn including perhaps about research and design, writing a business plans, etc!  So… to reiterate… seek advice of EXPERTS!
  2. If you don’t “do numbers” – get an accountant! Know where your money is going and be mindful of your expenses.  Remember that there are strict rules for tax purposes regarding what is a business and what is deemed a “hobby”.
  3. Sometimes you have to spend money to make money! What I mean by a saying I have said more than once in front of audiences is that you need to have a marketing / advertising budget. It pains me to see creative people start a company only to have it fall flat as there were no plans for advertising. Sigh.                                                                   By the way – have an AMAZING website and a strong social media presence.
  4. Be kind as nothing good has come out of being a mean entrepreneur.  Competition will happen. Others will have different or even better ideas than yours.  Look inside yourself on how to be successful and don’t blame “the other guy” for ruining your business.
  5. Hire competent people.  An intern can be a valuable asset to your company or a disaster. Remember they are learning and you are offering them an opportunity. Interns, as a rule, shouldn’t be running your company.  Hire people who are able to do the job because they are experts at the job.
  6. Pay fair wages. Period.
  7. Stay educated and give back to your local area. Nearly every profession changes – stay on top of the “learning curve”.   There is value to seeking help from those who have walked a similar path.  Be proactive and attend networking meetings and join your local chamber of commerce.
  8. Not all good ideas become successful businesses.  Not all people can be successful entrepreneurs, even if they have good ideas.  Why? EGO!  Some people believe that all they need is a great concept and charm to succeed. Sorry – charm isn’t usually associated with ROI.
  9. Give back to your community by supporting local charitable organizations. 
Electric bulb idea concept design

Having a great idea doesn’t always guarantee a successful business!

 

Now your turn to add to the list in the comment section below. 

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